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Time for another PR refresher

By Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
June 12, 2014

As summer is officially here, with it comes a clean slate of (hopefully) good weather and fun stuff to do, with a little work mixed in, of course. That said, I thought it also seemed like a good time to re-post LM’s PR refresher, which is basically a handy (and mostly friendly) primer for PR professionals looking to foster good relationships with editors. You may have seen this before so if this is old hat to you, please accept my apologies in advance.

For those of you in the public relations world, here is a handy list featuring detailed information on how to send pitches to me, as well as my colleagues at Logistics Management and the other Peerless Media titles, including Modern Materials Handling and Supply Chain Management Review.

This blog is replete with tips, ideas, and suggestions for how to pitch us. I realize this is mainly targeted for PR types so for those that it does not apply to, please accept my apologies in advance. Here it is:

For those PR people out there, please feel free to offer up comments of suggestions of ways editors can work better with you. We are all in this thing together, so please don’t be shy.

If you are like me, you are very busy and have a lot of work to do pretty much all of the time. I know this is also true for my friends on the other side of the editorial fence-the PR community. Having worked in PR for roughly five minutes in a previous life, I can relate to your day-to-day challenges, demands, and workload. That said, I thought it might be a good time to use Newsroom Notes to provide some working tips for ways of best communicating with us at LM.

Below is a list of PR do’s and don’ts that I used when participating at a “Meet the Editors” panel at previous TSMA Conferences. But before I give you the list, please remember this: I am not a PR contact for LM editorial calendar queries. Please send these pitches to Mike Levans at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) and Sarah Petrie .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
And now, here are some PR guidelines for you. Some may seem overly basic and others may not to be believed…but, believe me, these things happen quite a bit to say the least. Hope you PR folks find it useful.

1-Do NOT call us five minutes after you e-mail us a press release to “gauge our interest” in running it as a story.
There is possibly nothing more annoying to an editor than that. If we are interested, we will get in touch. Trust me on that.

2-Do NOT send a press release with a subject line that reads ‘press release,’ with no text and simply an attachment (with the release). If you can’t take the time to write two or three sentences describing what you are sending us, then we will probably not take the time to figure out what it is you are sending us.

3-If we ask you to add our personal and general e-mail addresses to your press list, don’t ‘tell’ us you will add us to the list…actually DO it. Simply put, if you want us to pick up one of your releases, make the effort and take the required steps to make sure this happens. This is basically PR 101, yet it is frightening how many companies/industry organizations overlook this.

4-KNOW the publication before pitching us. Send us press releases, story suggestions and ideas based on what the publication focuses on and its actual readership. In LM’s case, it usually is ‘what is important about this release for shippers?’

5-As an addendum to the previous item, ACTUALLY READ THE MAGAZINE before pitching us. We generally do not care about ‘Joe Smith joining company X as a data entry associate.’ That is simply a waste of time for everyone involved and the person/company sending that type of release should know better. Also, if ‘company x hires a new HR director,’ we do not care. Again, ask yourself if shippers care about something before sending it.

6-If you list a media contact on a press release, make sure that person is equipped to handle any media queries an editor may have. For example, if the media contact is traveling with limited phone/e-mail access, then that person should not be on the release. It only makes sense.

7. If you are running late for a call, please pick up the phone and tell me that! This is VERY important, you see. This way we can re-schedule the call for later in the day or another date altogether. I find it truly amazing that stuff like this happens with the frequency it does. As part II of this, please send me the dial in number for calls that require them so I am not wasting time tracking you down to get it. Little things like this make a big difference if you want to foster a good working relationship with editors.

8. DO NOT call me multiple times per day or over the span of a few days and not leave a message. This is a bit of a “new one” in terms of incredibly bad PR. For some reason, this is viewed as a best PR practice, when in reality it is incredibly exasperating and annoying from my end. Here is a quick and basic tip: LEAVE A MESSAGE. The more you call me numerous times in a single day and not leave a message, the less inclined I am to pick up the phone. Trust me on that.

About the Author

Jeff Berman headshot
Jeff Berman
Group News Editor

Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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