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TMC elevates C.H. Robinson’s software profile

“Software as a service was a great leap forward, but shippers, despite significant investment and time implementing, still struggle to realize the full benefits of their purchase,” said Jordan Kass, executive director of TMC in an interview.
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
March 30, 2011

C.H. Robinson Worldwide, Inc., has leveraged its TMC division, expanding the capabilities of its Managed TMS, and enabling it to offer TMS software plus managed services globally.

“Software as a service was a great leap forward, but shippers, despite significant investment and time implementing, still struggle to realize the full benefits of their purchase,” said Jordan Kass, executive director of TMC in an interview.

In an interview with LM, he said the concept of a “mega city” – a major center of urban activity expected to boom over the next decade –has emerged and is becoming a critical factor in how supply chains are designed.

“Our clients have global supply chains, but have been frustrated by the lack of options to help them manage their day-to-day requirements and correctly allocate resources in global markets” said Kass in a statement. “Managed TMS meets those needs by executing operations in global geographies with TMS technology and power users.  It gives customers the resources, visibility and information needed to lower costs, raise efficiencies, and elevate the overall management to a more strategic level.”

C.H. Robinson— one of the largest third party logistics companies in the world—provides global multimodal transportation services and logistics software.

Spokesmen said that this new platform provides consistent technology outcomes and supports shippers in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

Managed TMS is based on control tower innovation, a multi-regional freight management system for a global supply chain network, designed to overcome transportation challenges at a global, regional and local level. TMC control towers are located in Chicago, Amsterdam, and Mumbai.

These Managed TMS control towers provide shippers with global transportation management and software tools such as currency conversion, order optimization and carbon footprint reporting. Combining TMC power users with the TMS software allows shippers to realize full software benefits and achieve best practices shared across carriers, factories, and warehouses throughout the world, the company maintained.

For related stories click here.

About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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