Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


Transportation pricing trends - August 2011

By Staff
August 01, 2011





 

Trucking
Buyers of LTL services have been hot under the collar even without a summer heat wave. Why so steamed? Because in July 2011, shippers saw average LTL prices surge 10.4% above year ago levels. That was the single largest such price hike since the
Labor Department began reporting these prices in 1992. LTL tags are forecast to increase 8.2% in 2011. Justifying all price hikes, the trucking industry's costs (excluding labor) shot up 8.3% in the year-over-year period ending May 2011. Cost escalation to operate trucking companies is accelerating, with only one speed bump in the offing—a possible double-dip recession. Our aggregate trucking price forecast stands unchanged, up






 

Air
Drewry Shipping Consultants' international air freight price index has registered year-over-year declines for seven straight months, but prices for flying freight in the belly of U.S-owned planes on scheduled flights has flown in the opposite direction. In June 2011, this U.S. air cargo price index registered its third month in a row of year-ago gains exceeding 11%. From 2001 to June 2011, our airfreight price index increased 60.6%. That's about on par with the airline industry's 58.4% escalation rate in total costs that took place over the same ten-year period. (Our 10-year cost analysis includes a 344% increase in fuel cost escalation.)
For all of 2011, our air cargo price index will be up 9.3%.






 

Water
U.S.-owned barges and cargo vessels on inland waterways, excluding towboats, boosted their average transaction prices by 3.3% from May to June. Ships on the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence seaway as well as domestic deep-sea freight carriers also hiked prices 4.6% and 2.1%, respectively. Looking at year-over-year escalation rates, the three respective inflation numbers entered the books at 18.6%, 13.1%, and 9.4%. Unlike trucking and airfreight, the U.S. waterborne freight industry continues to beat the underlying cost inflation devils. Year-overyear cost escalation in this industry increased only 2.8% in May 2011. The U.S. water transportation industry's price escalation forecast remains 6% in 2011 and 3% in 2012.






 

Rail
Intermodal rail operators reported average transaction prices dropped an unexpected 1.2% from May to June 2011. Nonetheless, year-over-year intermodal tags have increased for 11 consecutive months, ending June at 7.6%. Also escalating for seven months in a row, carload prices were up 6.4% in the 12-months ending June. For every $100 of rail services sold, ALERTdata analysis shows the rail industry spends $13.38 on a budget category called "financial, insurance, and capital management professional services." Keeping those costs under control may yield some price concessions for shippers. In any case, we forecast rail transportation tags to rise 7.8% in 2011, before falling 1.4% in 2012.

Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

With an eye on capitalizing on future trade and commerce growth in South Asia, express delivery and logistics services provider DHL today rolled out its plans to build an $85 million EUR ($93 million USD) DHL Express South Asia Hub, which will be a 24-hour express hub facility within the Changi Airfreight Center at the Singapore Changi Airport.

While the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) has long stated its goal of having Positive Train Control (PTC) technology installed on 40 percent of its network by December 31, 2015, railroad industry stakeholders have repeatedly stated that reaching that deadline would be a stretch. It now appears that the railroad sector has some members of Congress sharing the same line of thought with legislation rolled out this week that pledges to extend the PTC deadline to 2020.

West Coast port authorities may be overstating the obvious when they decry “business as usual.” But it’s refreshing to see them finally coming around.

Transportation stakeholders reliant on North Carolina’s major seaports are welcoming news this week, which outlines plans to enhance the intermodal and cold chain network in the region.

The index ISM uses to measure non-manufacturing growth—known as the NMI—was 56.9 in February, which was 0.2 percent ahead of January and also 0.1 percent ahead of the 12-month average of 56.8. Economic activity in the non-manufacturing sector has grown for the last 61 months, according to ISM.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA