Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!



U.S. seaports manage change on their own

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
July 01, 2011

The Port of Long Beach, which has been promoting free market solutions to address air pollution concerns for some time, is celebrating the nation’s Independence Day weekend by closing an irksome contractual loophole.

An older group of trucks not originally included in the port landmark Clean Trucks Program will be banned from port shipping terminals beginning today, July 1.

It should be noted that the Sierra Club and the Teamsters had nothing to do with this decision.

Since it began in 2008, the award-winning Clean Trucks Program has decreased drayage truck related pollution by 80 percent, two years ahead of schedule.

Significantly, this was done without union coercion or their would-be organizers.

About 500 “Class 7” trucks - smaller, less powerful rigs - will be barred from working at the port.

Beginning in 2008, the Clean Trucks Program has required the trucking industry to switch to newer, low-emission Class 8, heavy-duty trucks for shipping containers in and out of the port complex.

Today, more than 10,000 clean trucks, meeting stringent 2007 federal emission standards, service the Port. They account for 93 percent of the container traffic.

Class 7 rigs were not originally included in the Clean Trucks Program’s progressive ban of older trucks because they were not typically used in container transport. But some companies began using them to move lighter loads, such as empty containers, as older Class 8 trucks were denied access to the port.

The Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners closed the loophole in January by including Class 7s in the Clean Trucks Program.

“Although the Class 7 rigs did not represent a big percentage of the drayage truck fleet there was still a matter of fairness to the trucking industry partners who got on board early and invested millions to buy cleaner, less polluting trucks,” said port Executive Director Richard D. Steinke. “This renews our commitment to cleaning up our operations. Although air quality is much better than it was even just a few years ago, we will always be looking for ways to be greener.”

The port estimates that about 500 Class 7 trucks with 2003 engine models or older will be banned from the Port starting July 1. Most Class 8 trucks with engines older than 2004 were banned at the start of 2010.

Beginning January 1, 2012, all drayage trucks will have to meet the 2007 federal emission standards.

For related articles click here.

About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

The current status of FedEx’ planned acquisition of Netherlands-based TNT-NV and a provider of mail and courier services and the fourth largest global parcel operator for $4.8 billion, which was initially announced in April, remains in flux, with continued actions being taken by the European Commission.

Panjiva said that the 1 percent sequential growth was in line with typically flat growth from May to June, as higher monthly growth typically takes hold in July and August in advance of the holiday season.

Hackett officials described this new offering as a short-term index that offers up “the sentiment for trade at a glance,” akin to other key economic metrics like the PMI and Consumer and Carrier confidence indices, while providing access to specifically see where a group of economic indicators are in relation to trade for the current month, too.

While many industry analysts contend that distribution centers near U.S. East Coast ports will see a surge of new business after the Panama Canal expansion, real estate experts say this phenomena is already underway.

A new Government Accountability Office report on the effects of changes to truck driver hours of service rules has sparked a war of words between the American Trucking Associations and Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, the arm of the Transportation Department that is in charge of making those rules.

Article Topics

Blogs · Ocean Freight · Green · Ocean Cargo · All topics

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA