West Coast Ag shippers warn of prolonged dockside labor discussions

“Powerful global and national trends that are out of your (and our) control are beginning to determine how much import and export cargo will flow through West Coast ports,” says AgTC.

By ·

While negotiations for a new labor contract covering nearly 20,000 dockworkers at 29 West Coast ports are continuing, shippers are urging The Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) to come to terms for a new six-year contract quickly.

According to Peter Friedmann, Executive Director, Agriculture Transportation Coalition (AgTC), there are several compelling reasons why U.S. West Coast ports are facing “critical” challenges. 

“Powerful global and national trends that are out of your (and our) control are beginning to determine how much import and export cargo will flow through West Coast ports,” says Friedmann in an open letter to Robert McEllrath, President, ILWU and James McKenna, President & CEO, PMA. “These trends are of concern to us and should be of concern to you…we are in the same boat.”

The talks, which began on May 12, remain on the table until an agreement on coast-wide contract expires on June 30, 2014. Media reports that the talks had been “suspended” were inaccurate, says PMA spokesman, Wade Gates.

Meanwhile, Friedmann says his constituents share a number of concerns:

*Production of consumer goods, including consumer electronics, toys, processed foods, footwear, apparel, household goods, furniture, etc. will continue to migrate from North Asia (Korea, Japan, China) towards South Asia (Vietnam, Singapore, Bangladesh, India). As manufacturing moves south, it also is moving closer to the Suez Canal; what moves through the Suez Canal goes directly to the U.S. East Coast ports.

*The eastern third of the country contains two thirds of American consumers. Since the last Census, six of the seven fastest growing states were in the East/South. That is why importers of consumer goods are increasingly bringing those cargoes through the most direct route, via the Suez Canal to the ports closest to those consumers.
*Major U.S. importers, recognizing the population density on the East Coast and some of the trends above, are locating their largest distribution centers strategically, close to the East Coast populations and ports. Whether Memphis or Spartanburg or Houston, these distribution centers are closer to East and Gulf Coast ports, than to the West Coast ports, and could increasingly take market share from the West Coast.

*As manufacturing returns to the U.S., such as auto plants, it appears to be going to the “Right to Work” states, which are close to Southeastern ports. Imported components could enter through nearby Southeast ports, and finished products would then exit those ports.

*If an increasing share of our imports start entering predominantly through Gulf and East Coast ports, that is where the “empties” will be. The railroads will have to bring the containers from those locations, to the places where our agriculture is produced, or bring that agriculture by rail and transship into containers at those East and Gulf Coast ports. This will be more costly, but it will not be impossible for the flow of some (but certainly not all) ag and forest products to change directions. Instead of heading west from our Midwest, it could head east or south before being loaded on a ship. That is already happening, contends AgTC.

Tomorrow: Port productivity


About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at [email protected]

Subscribe to Logistics Management Magazine!

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Article Topics

Container · Labor Management · Seaports · All Topics
Latest Whitepaper
New Supply Chain Technology Best Practices
New breakthrough developments, such as drones and driverless vehicles, seem to be everywhere.
Download Today!
From the October 2017 Logistics Management Magazine Issue
A leading distributor of professional salon products in the U.S. forms unique partnerships with its key LTLs to lower transport costs, reduce its carbon footprint and improve service to its 565 store locations.
Q4 2017 Rail/Intermodal Roundtable: Improvements apparent; work remains
LM Viewpoint: Collaboration, Now more than ever
View More From this Issue
Subscribe to Our Email Newsletter
Sign up today to receive our FREE, weekly email newsletter!
EDITORS' PICKS
SalonCentric: One Beautiful Network
A leading distributor of professional salon products in the U.S. forms unique partnerships with its...
2017 Alliance Awards: Recognizing outstanding supply chain partnerships
In an era where effective supply chain collaboration is both highly valued and elusive, Logistics...

26th Annual Study of Logistics and Transportation Trends: Transportation at Digital Speed
While a majority of companies strongly agree that transportation is a strategically important...
34th Annual Quest for Quality Awards: Winners Revealed
Which carriers, third-party logistics providers, and North American ports have crossed the service...