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WMS on the Cloud: Could It Really Work for Your Company?

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Warehouse management technology is now available in an on-demand delivery model, offering a lower cost, reduced risk option. Here are four reasons your management team needs to consider putting your WMS on the cloud.




January 04, 2011

So the world probably doesn’t need another whitepaper detailing the benefits of a warehouse management system (which, by the way, are increased productivity, real-time access to information, up to 99+ percent inventory accuracy, faster shipping, better collaboration with partners
and improved customer service, to name a few).

But perhaps your business has been putting off installing a new WMS because no one is entirely sure the benefits outweigh the potential risks to your business.

You’re not convinced either. “Do I have enough staff to install and support such a sophisticated system? Our IT department is pretty overwhelmed already. And all the infrastructure costs…” You wonder if a WMS will deliver a return that makes the time and financial investment worthwhile. Are we getting warm?

WMS in the cloud – Can it really work for you, or is it just fluff?


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