WTO reports surge in global trade

As reported in LM, both the ocean and air freight sectors have benefitted of late by this resurgence in global trade

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The value of world merchandise trade rose around 25 percent in the first six months of 2010 up strongly from the same period of 2009. This surge in trade growth marks a continuation of the trend begun in the first quarter of the year, according to WTO figures released yesterday.

“World merchandise exports increased by about 7 percent in the second quarter of 2010, in comparison with the first quarter,” noted WTO spokesmen. “Within that period, available monthly statistics for about 70 economies representing about 90 percent of world trade show that merchandise trade declined in April and May 2010, then rose again in June.”

As reported in LM, both the ocean and air freight sectors have benefitted of late by this resurgence in global trade.

Asian exports and imports both rose by more than 35 percent in the second quarter of 2010, as compared to the corresponding period of 2009. Exports from Africa and the Middle East were 35 percent higher than in the corresponding period of 2009, fuelled by demand in Asia and the U.S., and higher commodity prices.?

The Commonwealth of Independent States (former members of the Soviet Union) posted a buoyant 44 percent export growth. Similarly, extra-EU trade (external trade between the EU and the rest of the world) was more dynamic than trade within the EU.


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Article Topics

Air Freight · Exports · Freight · Global Trade · Imports · Trade · All Topics
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