2012 Supply Chain Software Users Survey

By Bridget McCrea, Contributing Editor
May 01, 2012 - LM Editorial

 
Top line overview
Stabilization is the name of the game in 2012 as companies steadily add more supply chain technology to their stables and/or upgrade their existing systems. This is a good sign compared to the spending decreases that the survey picked up on in 2009 and 2010.

When asked how the current economic climate has changed their companies’ approach to supply chain management software spending, 31 percent of respondents say that they’re scrutinizing their software purchases, down from 33 percent in 2011.

Twenty-one percent say they are still freezing investments, up from 18 percent last year, while 21 percent say that they’ll be making investments in new software in the next 12 months.

Another 21 percent say they plan to upgrade existing systems, compared to 22 percent the year prior—another indication that upgrade intentions have finally stabilized.



About the Author

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Bridget McCrea
Contributing Editor

Bridget McCrea is a Contributing Editor for Logistics Management based in Clearwater, Fla. She has covered the transportation and supply chain space since 1996, and has covered all aspects of the industry for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. She can be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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