Modern’s 5th Annual Salary Survey

Companies are increasingly rewarding hard work by key players in an effort to not only keep them around, but keep them happy.
By Josh Bond, Associate Editor
September 01, 2012 - MMH Editorial

The results of Modern’s 5th Annual Salary Survey illustrate an industry of experienced, loyal and contented materials handling professionals. At $89,760, the average base salary is the highest in the five years of our survey. Just as impressive: An unprecedented 98% of more than 940 respondents expressed satisfaction with their work. (Read last year’s survey: Materials handling on the uptick.)

But one change we’re seeing following the economic downturn is that individual performance is prized more highly than ever, and incentive strategies once based on increased sales now center on overall company performance.

The current state of materials handling salaries mirrors the rubber band effect of strong industry growth following the economic downturn; now that pent-up demand has been somewhat relieved, compensation in general is returning to normal. However, companies that successfully navigated the recession are rewarding those individuals who helped most, and companies everywhere are ready to pay top dollar for top talent.

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About the Author

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Josh Bond
Associate Editor

Josh Bond is an associate editor to Modern. Josh was formerly Modern’s lift truck columnist and contributing editor, has a degree in Journalism from Keene State College and has studied business management at Franklin Pierce.


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