Advanced Charging Technologies partners with Green Charge Technologies

Partnership to include development of next generation of industrial and electric vehicle battery chargers and monitoring systems.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
July 15, 2014 - MMH Editorial

Advanced Charging Technologies (ACT), a leader in industrial and electric vehicle battery charging, has announced a partnership with Green Charge Technologies (GCT), a high tech firm specializing in energy efficient and cost effective battery charging and monitoring solutions.

ACT and GCT will collaborate to improve the existing ACT solution portfolio as well as begin development on the next generation of industrial and electric vehicle battery chargers and monitoring systems.

“We at GCT are quite excited about partnering with ACT,” said Dr. Nasser Kutkut, founder of GCT. “As ACT has become a formidable player in the industrial and EV battery charger markets over a short period of time, combining ACT solutions portfolio with GCT’s expertise and technology know how will allow ACT to offer state of art solutions and increase their market share.”

“ACT is extremely enthusiastic about our new relationship with Nasser and his team at GCT,” said Bob Istwan, president of ACT. “ACT has accomplished a lot over our first four years, however this new partnership will take ACT to a whole new level.”



Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

February manufacturing data issued today by the Institute for Supply Management (ISM) dipped slightly compared to January, according to the most recent edition of the organization’s Manufacturing Report on Business.

As U.S. West Coast ports begin to address their critical congestion issues, an innovative approach is being launched at San Pedro Bay.

The ongoing financial travails of the Highway Trust Fund was made clear in a position paper recently issued by Jeff Davis, senior fellow at the Eno Center for Transportation. In the paper–entitled “Why Not A Ten-Year Surface Transportation Bill?”-Davis points to past federal transportation bills, as well as the White House’s GROW AMERICA proposal as having one fatal flaw in common: they each leave the HTF on worst financial shape after the bill expires than it was prior to the bill being enacted.

Working with research partner, The Economist Intelligence Unit, the IBM Institute for Business Value surveyed 1,023 global procurement executives from 41 countries in North America, Europe and Asia.

U.S. Carloads were down 7.8 percent annually at 259,544, and intermodal volume was off 15.7 percent for the week ending February 21 at 213,617 containers and trailers.

About the Author

Josh Bond, Associate Editor
Josh Bond is an associate editor to Modern. Josh was formerly Modern’s lift truck columnist and contributing editor, has a degree in Journalism from Keene State College and has studied business management at Franklin Pierce. Contact Josh Bond

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.