Air Cargo shippers aim to speak with one voice

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
November 15, 2010 - LM Editorial

Four organizations have signed a letter of intent committing to work towards the formation of an industry advisory group facilitated by TIACA to ensure the air cargo industry has a strong, unified voice in its dealings with worldwide regulatory authorities and other bodies whose decisions directly impact on air cargo.

The agreement commits the International Air Cargo Association (TIACA), the International Air Transport Association (IATA), the International Federation of Freight Forwarders Associations (FIATA), and the Global Shippers’ Forum (GSF) to work together to look at their current positions on issues such as security, customs reform, e-commerce, and the environment and to try to find common ground to best protect and promote the interests of the air cargo industry, the organizations and customers.

The review will also look at the associations’ respective resources committed to industry affairs and consider how to make the most effective use of the existing and growing relationships that TIACA, GSF, FIATA and IATA have with relevant government departments and other regulatory bodies.

The associations will also discuss the involvement of other global industry groups in the air cargo supply chain and seek the support of bodies such as the World Customs Organization (WCO).

Michael Steen, vice chairman of TIACA, said that, collectively, the four organizations represent the most powerful grouping of all parties involved in the air cargo supply chain.

“We all share a common goal to protect our members against costly and sometimes unnecessary changes in legislation and to have a practical input into any future regulatory challenges before they become mandatory. We also want to have the strongest possible voice when it comes to highlighting to policy makers the vital role air cargo plays in world trade, in employment, in consumer choice and in the growth of developing markets,” said Steen.



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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Article Topics

Blogs · Air Cargo · Freight · Supply Chain · Trade · All topics

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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