Air Cargo shippers relieved by TSA move to axe regulation

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
July 15, 2014 - LM Editorial

TIACA has applauded a move by U.S. regulators towards a more risk-based approach to air cargo screening.

The International Air Cargo Association (TIACA) has welcomed the U.S. Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA’s) decision to lift requirements for air cargo screening reports, less than a year after calling for the regulation to be axed.

TSA has announced that it will no longer require the industry to provide air cargo screening volume reporting, a requirement which TIACA warned last fall was putting strain on the industry.

“This will significantly relieve the reporting burden on industry, saving many labor and IT hours,” says Doug Brittin, Secretary General, TIACA.

“All passenger carriers, and over 1,200 Certified freight forwarders and shippers in the U.S., have been required to measure and provide these reports monthly.”

“We applaud this move as a positive step towards adopting a risk-based approach versus forensic compliance.”

Last September, TIACA chairman Oliver Evans wrote to TSA Administrator John Pistole commending the TSA’s collaborative approach to implementing security programs, and its successful implementation of 100% mandatory screening for all cargo on passenger planes into and out of U.S. airports.

Evans called for TSA’s screening achievement to be certified and the reporting requirement to be lifted. “We are delighted the requirements have now been lifted,” says Evans.

“This move allows industry and government to properly focus limited resources on measures that materially benefit security.

“We represent all sections of the air freight supply chain and we are dedicated to continuing our close work with regulators to ensure global cargo security measures are effective and efficient, while ensuring the flow of commerce.”

Brittin says regular and ongoing inspections of industry’s cargo screening processes made the reports unnecessary, and suggested the personnel and IT resource being used to fulfil the requirement, for both government and industry, could be better deployed.

After the September 11th 2001 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York, the U.S. Government’s Implementing the Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act, passed in August 2007, required 100% of all cargo on passenger aircraft into and out of U.S. airports to be physically screened.



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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Article Topics

News · Air Cargo · Air Freight · Global · All topics

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at [email protected]

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