Air cargo to surge in Africa

Nowhere is the potential for aviation greater than on the African continent—the home to a billion people spread across 20% of the world’s land mass
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
June 03, 2013 - LM Editorial

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) opened its 69th Annual General Meeting (AGM) and World Air Transport Summit in Cape Town, South Africa today. The meeting kicked-off with strong calls for African governments to take full advantage of aviation as a catalyst for growth and development.

“Nowhere is the potential for aviation greater than on the African continent—the home to a billion people spread across 20% of the world’s land mass. Economic reforms and political stability have spurred growth and development. South Africa is the newest member of the BRICS grouping of states. And the 50th anniversary of the African Union reminds us of its vision for an integrated, prosperous and peaceful Africa, driven by its own citizens and representing a dynamic force in the global arena. Aviation is well placed to contribute to these and the other long-term goals so vital to the development of Africa,” said Tony Tyler, IATA’s Director General and CEO.

The AGM was opened with formal addresses from the Deputy President of the Republic of South Africa, Kgalema Motlanthe; and the Minister for Public Enterprise of the Republic of South Africa, Malusi Gigaba. In the opening session, Acting Chief Executive Officer of South African Airways, Nico Bezuidenhout was elected President of the AGM.

“Global connectivity—enabled by aviation—has a very powerful role to play both in integrating the 54 national economies of Africa and in connecting them to the world. With a few kilometers of tarmac, even the most remote destination becomes a part of the global community. But this will require the commitment of governments to solve some major issues,” said Tyler.

Safety is the biggest challenge facing African aviation. “IATA’s 20 Sub-Saharan members are performing in line with the global average on safety as are the 24 Sub-Saharan airlines that have met the 900+ standards of the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA). But if we look at the entire African industry, safety remains a challenge with an overall accident rate many times the global average. This AGM is an opportunity to send a clear signal to the region’s governments that world class safety is possible in Africa and that we support their commitment to achieving it by 2015,” said Tyler.



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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