ALAN supports relief efforts in Philippines following Typhoon Haiyan

American Logistics Aid Network anticipates a need for warehouse space on the U.S. West Coast near air and sea ports.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
November 13, 2013 - MMH Editorial

The American Logistics Aid Network is working to coordinate logistics for an emergency response to Typhoon Haiyan. On November 7th, the typhoon made landfall in the Philippines and became one of the largest and deadliest storms ever recorded.

“Relief efforts have only just begun in the wake of massive destruction and significant loss of life,” said a statement on “While aid from the United States and other countries began to flow in on Monday, getting supplies into the affected areas is still a challenge, since roads are blocked by debris and airports are shut down.”

ALAN is supporting U.S. domestic logistics requests, including requests for transportation and warehouse space. ALAN is working closely with the U.S. arms of partner agencies to determine what resources are most needed and will post those requests to its online portal as soon as details become available. Right now, they anticipate a need for warehouse space near U.S. West Coast air and sea ports.

“We want to remind everyone to please remember to ‘connect before you collect’; before donating, make sure you have spoken directly with an aid group and know precisely what they need, where it needs to go, and how you’ll get it to them,” the statement continued. “Sending supplies from the U.S. is costly and slow. Many organizations prefer cash so they can buy supplies locally; doing so will help the Philippine economy recover quickly.”

The ALAN portal lists some product-related requests for generators, food, household supplies, tarps, and other goods. While we do not actively solicit product donations, some businesses may wish to see and support those requests.

“Because needs are still emerging, we hope you will stay tuned to our website,, to follow developments over the coming days and weeks as we navigate what promises to be an extremely challenging recovery period.”

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About the Author

Josh Bond, Senior Editor
Josh Bond is Senior Editor for Modern, and was formerly Modern’s lift truck columnist and associate editor. He has a degree in Journalism from Keene State College and has studied business management at Franklin Pierce University.


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