American Airlines adds value to the cold chain

ExpediteTC, will include a new solution for the requirements of cold packaging during transit
image
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
October 02, 2011 - LM Editorial

On the eve of the annual meeting of The Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) annual meeting this week, American Airlines Cargo division announced the expansion of its cold-chain service.

ExpediteTC will include a new solution for the requirements of cold packaging during transit.

The new solution, called ExpediteTC Passive, supports ambient temperature control using state-of-the-art cool rooms, expedited handling processes and high-visibility monitoring to ensure cargo is handled within desired temperature ranges. This offering augments American’s current service, ExpediteTC Active, which utilizes dry ice and battery-powered containers to actively regulate temperature levels, regardless of ambient conditions.

“Our new ExpediteTC Passive cold-chain service provides our customers with another important option for moving time- and temperature-sensitive cargo,” said Dave Brooks, president of American Airlines Cargo. “The worldwide rollout of this service is supported by extensive training to provide a consistent, reliable service across our network.”

Preparation for launch of the new service included a pilot program and training of 2,400 ground and warehouse employees around the world. The service integrates American’s proprietary high-visibility system with distinct processes used by employees to support temperature control during handling.

American Airlines has been an innovator in this technology from the very beginning,” said Brandon Fried, executive director of the Air Forwarders Association. “It comes as no surprise that they are continuing to refine their technology.

Shippers may access online tracking and receive notification alerts via e-mail or mobile phone. ExpediteTC is supported by a 100 percent money-back guarantee that the shipment will be flown on the routing for which it was booked. In addition, a help desk is available for the service 24 hours a day, seven days a week.



About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

The 'Internet of Things' or IoT is a term that has rapidly taken center stage in business and consumer technology circles, with tremendous amounts of hype in both. Don't be distracted if some of the hypothetical consumer examples of the IoT seem far-fetched; the trend has serious implications for businesses. This complimentary whitepaper takes a look at some of the opportunities afforded by the Internet of Business Things.

Of special interest to readers of Logistics Management will be “Americas Update,” which will look into the future of the market in the Americas and assess how firms will be able to favorably position themselves to compete and win market share.

After 20 years, two congressional mandates and countless lawsuits and lobbying efforts, safety advocates and the Teamsters union still say there are too many inexperienced rookie truck drivers hitting the road without sufficient behind-the-wheel training.

Congested U.S. port terminals, harbor and over-the-road truck and driver shortages, slower trains and longer rail terminal dwell times due to increased domestic rates have not only disrupted service but also driven intermodal rates and cargo handling costs up sharply.

Southern California shippers are getting a break on container dwell expenses for the next ten days as the Port of Long Beach announced that it had added an extra three days to the time that overseas import containers can remain on the docks without charge.

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA