American Worldwide Agencies Partners with Australian E-commerce Company Qannu

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
September 23, 2013 - SCMR Editorial

American Worldwide Agencies (AWA), a global network of freight forwarders and agents, recently announced that it is partnering with Australian e-commerce company Qannu to provide it with direct-to-consumer internet shopping service.

Qannu’s services enable Australian consumers to order goods from any number of U.S. websites while paying only one international shipping charge.

Consumers can order through the Qannu website (http://www.qannu.com) or directly from a U.S. e-retailer, using a shipping address that directs goods to a unique “mailbox” at the Qannu warehouse in Los Angeles. When an order arrives at the warehouse, the consumer can opt for immediate shipping to destination or ask that goods be held for consolidation with additional orders.

Qannu uses AWA to provide delivery of consolidated packages direct to the consumer’s door in five to eight days, at a savings of up to 80 percent over traditional shipping methods. “The Australian consumer is looking for lowest price and a selection of products available in the U.S. market,” says Bridget Speed, marketing director for Qannu.

Brandon Fried, executive director of the Airforwarder’s Association, noted that while seemingly unique, many forwarders have for a long time accepted and assembled shipments on behalf of foreign buyers who purchase from U.S. retailers. 

“These purchases are consolidated in containers and on pallets with other shipments for trips to international destinations including Australia,” he told SCMR in an interview.  “The customers save money since the assembly of shipments into one unit tends to drive the airfreight cost per pound downward while creating an excellent value opportunity.”

Fried added that online interfacing tools and varying customer service strategies “tend to create different degrees of success” when competing in this field.



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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Article Topics

News · Global · Supply Chain · Management · All topics

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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