Automation: Day 2 at APICS. It’s all about people

Technology is great. But you’ll never achieve greatness if you don’t consider the human element.
By Bob Trebilcock, Executive Editor
October 01, 2013 - MMH Editorial

I don’t know about you, but I love equipment and technology. I’ve been visiting manufacturing plants and distribution centers for nearly 50 years – since my Dad took me on sales trips as a kid. I still get a little giddy watching cartons fly down a conveyor and sorter, AS/RS cranes move pallets or cartons or a pick-to-light or voice-directed picking solution. Some of my favorite conversations are with supply chain software companies who talk about their vision for directing warehousing and distribution operations.

They all make it sound so easy – so easy, in fact, its easy to forget that it still takes people to make it all happen. Maybe fewer people, thanks to automation, but people all the same. 

That was driven home yesterday as I listened to a presentation on multi-enterprise collaboration and visibility by Intel at Day 2 of APICS annual conference in Orlando.

Two executives from Intel described how Intel rolled out a pilot program for collaboration and supply chain visibility with its outsourced manufacturing partners – a program that will begin going live the end of this year. In many respects, the initiative has been in development since 2009. The backbone is a cloud-based software platform that allows Intel and its manufacturing partners to plug in, share demand forecasts and plans, inventory levels and order information.

So, you would have thought the center-piece of the presentation would have been the software sizzle. Instead, the real steak in the presentation was Intel’s effort to educate its employees and then its suppliers. For instance, the initiative got started in 2009 with an internal APICS certified supply chain professional certification program (CSCP). Classes taught by Intel instructors were offered across 14 sites worldwide and it was offered across functional areas of Intel’s enterprise and not just individuals traditionally associated with manufacturing, logistics and distribution. There has also been an intensive effort to educate suppliers – a crucial element to developing trust between Intel and its network of contract manufacturers.

There was another intensive effort to develop the business case – the ROI – in other words, to educate senior executives on the potential of the program.

In fact, the Intel presenters spent as much time talking about the importance of education to launching this program as they did about what the software does.

Just as important were the questions asked during the Q&A. While some were about the technologies involved in making this work, a majority were about education or shared stories about how in their organizations, the reluctance of employees to give up their old ways of doing things and buy into the new way was a hurdle to their own success.

Automation and technology is the heart and soul of our business. But lets not forget that we’ll never realize success with new processes and systems if people aren’t part of the solution. 



About the Author

Bob Trebilcock
Executive Editor

Bob Trebilcock, executive editor, has covered materials handling, technology and supply chain topics for Modern Materials Handling since 1984. More recently, Trebilcock became editorial director of Supply Chain Management Review. A graduate of Bowling Green State University, Trebilcock lives in Keene, NH. He can be reached at 603-357-0484.


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Supply chain security provider Freightwatch International has released its semi-annual report on cargo theft in the Asia Pacific region for the first half of 2014, which contains some heartening news for U.S. shippers reliant on trucking, warehousing and retail.

FedEx Ground, a subsidiary of FedEx Corporation, reports today that a decision by a three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit reversed previous rulings by the District Court for the Northern District of Indiana in three class action cases involving mostly former independent contractors for FedEx Ground

More talking remains before the deal is done

The transpacific U.S.-flag carrier has been ranked number one in the ocean carrier category for Logistics Management magazine's Quest for Quality award

This year, the Containerization & Intermodal Institute (CII) will be staging the “Connie” Awards dinner in conjunction with IANA’s Intermodal EXPO in Long Beach

About the Author

Bob Trebilcock, executive editor, has covered materials handling, technology and supply chain topics for Modern Materials Handling since 1984. A graduate of Bowling Green State University, Trebilcock lives in Keene, NH. Contact Bob Trebilcock.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.