2011 Customs Update: Balancing global priorities

Updated Incoterms, new trade agreements, and increasing demands for improvements in supply chain security are putting more pressure on global logistics managers. Our compliance expert offers an update on the evolving compliance scene and best practices for developing a “value chain” model for overcoming these challenges.
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Border Patrol Agents routinely conduct searches of trains entering the U.S. from Canada.

By Suzanne Richer, President, Customs & Trade Solutions, Inc.
January 14, 2011 - LM Editorial

Global supply chain and customs compliance professionals are now forced to wear many hats; and it appears that the evolving regulatory environment in 2011 will add a few more.

This year will find the introduction of updated Incoterms along with a new South Korea/U.S. trade agreement and continued demands for sustained improvements in supply chain security. And there’s little doubt that these mounting challenges will require a focused approach to managing current and emerging global compliance programs.

Taking a strategic approach towards managing global compliance trends supports a strong risk assessment model—and more importantly, adds value to a corporation’s bottom line through reduced costs. By installing a series of steps focused on cost savings, regulatory compliance, and an increased awareness of how a product is brought to market, companies can transform their regulatory compliance programs into a “value chain” model that supports a stronger bottom line to the corporation.

Click below for related articles. 

U.S., Korea make progress on trade pact

2010 retail container volumes expected to be up nearly 15 percent, says Port Tracker

Supply chain security in a high-risk world

 



About the Author

Suzanne Richer
President, Customs & Trade Solutions, Inc.

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