Beneficial cargo owners team to reshape transport infrastructure

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
November 01, 2013 - LM Editorial

The recent progress made in transport infrastructure legislation speaks volumes about the cooperation of logistics and supply chain community stakeholders. They, too, seem to reading from the same sheet of music on this issue.

While ongoing conflicts between rail and truck factions have not disappeared, both groups seem to agree that surface networks are in sorry disrepair. A comprehensive overhaul of our roads, highways, and railroads will benefit shippers using both modes of transport, as intermodal movement of goods is the fastest growth sector in the industry.

It is also heartening to see that our nation’s ports are working together toward this common end, even as they fight one another for volume market share and new ocean cargo carrier business.

Much credit for this goes to beneficial cargo owner (BCO) associations comprising the most active and informed voting constituents. Their ongoing efforts (and collective pressure) appears to be working with Washington lawmakers.



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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