BRICS Continue to Invest in Supply Chain Management Software

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
August 25, 2014 - SCMR Editorial

Cambashi, an independent industry analyst firm, based in Cambridge, UK. recently announced the 2014 second quarter update to its market data resource, the Cambashi Market Observatories.

These observatories provide a quantitative view of the technical applications software market available, providing a basis for analyzing size, growth, movement and other trends to support planning at local, regional and global levels.

Latest figures show a combined growth in the emerging nations of Brazil, Russia, India and China of 8.6% in 2013 over 2012. This is compared with 9.4% growth in 2012 over 2011 and suggests the rate of growth is slowing but is still strong.

Taking a view at more established market - especially when considering the technical applications software market, which is dominated by design and engineering software - anlysts see a 5.2 percent combined growth in France, Germany, the US and the UK in 2013 over 2012.  This compares well with the figure for 2012 over 2011 of 4.2%, which is in line with greater recovery and investment in these countries.

The set of Cambashi Market Observatories for technical applications software comprises the Cambashi Product Observatory, the Cambashi Country Observatory and the Cambashi Industry Observatory, which are all updated quarterly. Each covers the global view regionally and provides a country and industry perspective for more than 50 individual countries.

According to Cambashi analyst, Simon Hailstone, the latest data for Latin America shows a slowing of growth from 19% in 2011 to 4% in 2013.

“In real terms Brazil showed some recovery in 2013 at 11%, particularly in manufacturing sectors, although Mexico slowed to around 6% with construction still weak,” he told SCMR in an interview. “Smaller emerging countries such as Chile and Colombia held up well, around 8% in real terms, primarily due to the construction and mining sectors.”

Hailstone noted that compared with emerging countries in other regions, Latin America shows similar underlying trends in this period but with underlying growth still above established markets. 

“The slowing of growth in the major emerging countries of Russia, India and China has been more pronounced than most Latin American countries,” he said.



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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