Cambashi Report Measures Change in Global Makeup of Supply Chain Professionals

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
February 19, 2014 - SCMR Editorial

Cambashi, a leading global industry analyst and market consulting firm, recently announced the latest addition to their market data resource as the Cambashi Employment Observatory 2014. This data set quantifies the occupations represented in different industries across more than fifty countries worldwide. 

“Understanding the professional backgrounds and the mix of potential users within an industry supports decision making on several levels, from overall market potential for market planning purposes to the use of the most appropriate approaches to use in sales and marketing engagements with key users, through to even identifying adjacent occupations being addressed by product variants,” says Tony Christian, Cambashi Director. 

In an interview with SCMR, he says there are some interesting differences on one hand - and similarities on the other - between the “developed” North America (US and Canada) and the “developing” South America (including Mexico) that, when viewed together, show the importance of supply chain and logistics management in both regions.

“In North America approximately 10.8% of the overall workforce is classified as ‘managers’ and of that 10.8%, 2% are classified as managers in the field of supply chain and logistics,” says Christian. “In contrast, in South America, only about 4.4% of the workforce is classified as managers, which might be expected given the higher focus on ‘doing’ industries as opposed to ‘knowing’ industries.”

However, adds Christian, of the 4.4% of the workforce classified as managers, some 5.3% are classified as managers in the field of supply chain and logistics, reflecting the greater involvement in moving physical products and materials.

“It also means that, despite the different shapes of the developed and developing economies, about the same proportion of the overall workforce (around 0.2%) is engaged in management of supply chain and logistics.”



About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Following the lead of its Congressional Colleagues in the House of Representatives, the United States Senate yesterday approved a measure geared to keep federal surface transportation funding intact through the end of December with a nearly $11 billion stopgap fix.

XPO Logistics announced second quarter earnings and the acquisition of two companies, New Breed Logistics, a non asset-based 3PL focusing in contract logistics services, for roughly $615 million, and Atlantic Central Logistics, a 3PL provider of last-mile logistics services, for roughly $36.5 million.

The report, entitled “Outlook for the Domestic Transport and Logistics Market in 2H14 and Beyond,” takes the view that strong freight levels in the second quarter have left trucking companies in a good position: one in which they need to come up with new plans to handle rising demand. But even with that positive momentum afloat, the report observes that there are some familiar challenges intact, such as a lack of qualified drivers and the regulatory drag from the new hours-of-service rules that took effect in July 2013.

Flags of Convenience are a fact of life in the commercial maritime trade, but several European political action groups are worried that they will pose a threat to the Continent’s air cargo industry.

For May, which is the most recent month for which data is available, the SCI is -7.5, following April’s -7.5. FTR said this reading represents a still-tight capacity environment, as utilization rates hover between 98 percent and 99 percent.

Article Topics

News · Global · Supply Chain · Management · Cambashi · All topics

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.