CEMA reports booked orders for May down 16.7% annually

By Josh Bond, Contributing Editor
July 17, 2013 - LM Editorial

The Conveyor Equipment Manufacturers Association reported that its May 2013 booked orders decreased 16.7% when compared to May 2012 orders. Bob Reinfried, executive vice president for CEMA, said in a recent interview that the decline followed record-setting growth for the previous eight months.

“I knew we would see some softening, and historically we see things slow down a bit this time of year, but the feeling among members is that there’s no cause for concern,” he said, noting that last year was a record year. “We’ll see what happens in June, and if things continue to decline perhaps we’ll start being concerned.”

May 2013 booked orders when compared to April 2013 booked orders were down 25.4%. May booked orders were down 4.5% for bulk handling equipment and down 36.6% for unit handling equipment when compared to April.

CEMA’s May 2013 billed sales (shipments) decreased by 2.0% when compared to May 2012 sales. May 2013 billed sales when compared to April 2013 billed sales were down 3.2%.

May billed sales were up 1.6% for bulk handling equipment and down 5.7% for unit handling equipment when compared to April.



About the Author

Josh Bond
Contributing Editor

Josh Bond is a contributing editor to Modern. In addition to working on Modern’s annual Casebook and being a member of the Show Daily team, Josh covers lift trucks for the magazine.


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

After 20 years, two congressional mandates and countless lawsuits and lobbying efforts, safety advocates and the Teamsters union still say there are too many inexperienced rookie truck drivers hitting the road without sufficient behind-the-wheel training.

Congested U.S. port terminals, harbor and over-the-road truck and driver shortages, slower trains and longer rail terminal dwell times due to increased domestic rates have not only disrupted service but also driven intermodal rates and cargo handling costs up sharply.

Southern California shippers are getting a break on container dwell expenses for the next ten days as the Port of Long Beach announced that it had added an extra three days to the time that overseas import containers can remain on the docks without charge.

The long-simmering court battle over whether FedEx Ground’s workers are independent contractors or employees appears headed to the appellate courts—and maybe the U.S. Supreme Court.

Carload volume headed up 4.3 percent to 298,376, and intermodal units, at 273,376 containers and trailers were up 4.8 percent annually.

Article Topics

News · Materials Handling · CEMA · All topics

About the Author

Jeff Berman, News Editor
Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. Contact Jeff Berman.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA