Companies go green and expect suppliers to follow

By Modern Materials Handling Staff
March 01, 2010 - MMH Editorial

If your company is a supplier to corporate clients, be ready to discuss environmental business practices. That's the message from a survey by consulting firm A.T. Kearney (http://www.atkearney.com) and the Carbon Disclosure Project, a nonprofit organization that collects climate change data from the corporate world. According to the survey, 63% of the 44 responding member companies have a formal, documented corporate climate change strategy; 37% have general guidelines; and 90% have plans to reduce carbon emissions. They're looking to their partners to follow their “green” example: 6% are ready to de-select suppliers that won't manage carbon emissions and 56% plan to do so in the future.



Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Having introduced into the California State Senate a new bill designed to give an exemption from sales and use tax for port terminal operators purchasing zero or “near zero-emission” equipment, Lara is trying to advance to agendas.

The notions of “green shoots” or “cautious optimism” in gauging the current state of the economy does not specifically exhibit what is really happening, when assessing how things are actually going, it seems. That was made clear by Bob Costello, chief economist at the American Trucking Associations, at last week’s NASSTRAC (National Shippers Strategic Transportation Council) Shippers Conference and Transportation Expo in Orlando, Fla. last week.

With a 6.8 cent gain to $2.266 per gallon, this week’s average diesel price is at its highest level since the week of December 28, when it was at $2.237 per gallon.

Manufacturing activity in April remained on the right side of growth for the second straight month, following six months of contraction, according to the April edition of the Manufacturing Report on Business from the Institute for Supply Management (ISM).

Some 22 centuries after the original Silk Road smoothed the path of Chinese silk merchants to Europe, a new effort is beginning to build a new 21st century highway between Europe and the burgeoning economy of China, now the world’s fastest-growing market.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.