Do West Coast ports meet your needs? How well do they perform?

The Port Performance Research Network would like to know. Here’s how you can participate in their research project.
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By SCMR Staff
October 21, 2010 - SCMR Editorial

If you import or export via U.S. West Coast ports, then researchers of the Port Performance Research Network, chaired at Dalhousie University, want to hear from you.

The Network is seeking feedback from ports’ customers and stakeholders about their experiences with five U.S. west coast ports. Researchers want to understand how users evaluate the ports they use, and what aspects of port services are most important to them.

Participants in the study are asked to rate the importance of various performance criteria and then use those criteria to evaluate the ports they actually use. When the research is completed, the results will be used to design a port effectiveness survey that will be used throughout the world.

If you are interested, and you have personal experience with U.S. West Coast port’ in the last year, please visit the study’s website and take the anonymous survey. It requires about 20 minutes to complete. The survey ultimately will help to guide ports in improving the quality of their services, which will be a significant benefit to ports’ customers. We believe it will be time well spent.

To participate in the survey, please click here.



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Article Topics

News · Port · Exports · Seaports · Import · Research Survey · All topics

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