Do West Coast ports meet your needs? How well do they perform?

The Port Performance Research Network would like to know. Here’s how you can participate in their research project.
image
By SCMR Staff
October 21, 2010 - SCMR Editorial

If you import or export via U.S. West Coast ports, then researchers of the Port Performance Research Network, chaired at Dalhousie University, want to hear from you.

The Network is seeking feedback from ports’ customers and stakeholders about their experiences with five U.S. west coast ports. Researchers want to understand how users evaluate the ports they use, and what aspects of port services are most important to them.

Participants in the study are asked to rate the importance of various performance criteria and then use those criteria to evaluate the ports they actually use. When the research is completed, the results will be used to design a port effectiveness survey that will be used throughout the world.

If you are interested, and you have personal experience with U.S. West Coast port’ in the last year, please visit the study’s website and take the anonymous survey. It requires about 20 minutes to complete. The survey ultimately will help to guide ports in improving the quality of their services, which will be a significant benefit to ports’ customers. We believe it will be time well spent.

To participate in the survey, please click here.



Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

The tired cliché of “Perfect Storm,” is probably lost on East Coast shippers now weathering fierce winter winds and snow, but the expression still has currency on the Pacific Rim.

Owners of corporate fleets and fuel buyers face two dilemmas: a limited supply of cost-effective, low greenhouse-gas fuels, and little information on fuel sustainability impacts across the full production and use value chain.

U.S. Carloads were up 5 percent annually at 294,738, and intermodal at 253,317 containers and trailers was up 3 percent.

When it comes to Congress actually getting its act together on a new long-term federal transportation bill, things remain as status quo as it gets, with the big takeaway being nothing really ever gets done, when it comes to passing a badly overdue and needed bill, rather than these band-aid extensions Congress keeps signing off on.

Truckload and intermodal pricing was up on an annual basis, according to the December edition of the Truckload and Intermodal Cost Indexes from Cass Information Systems and Avondale Partners.

Article Topics

News · Port · Exports · Seaports · Import · Research Survey · All topics

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA