Egemin opens new production and test center for AGVs

Center to be equipped with slopes, loading docks, warehouse racks, customer-specific loads and battery exchange stations to simulate operational environment.
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By Modern Materials Handling Staff
October 03, 2013 - MMH Editorial

Egemin recently opened a brand new production and test center for its AGVs. The new center, called the E’gv Factory, has a total capacity that is over three times the capacity of the area it is replacing. With the expansion, Egemin aims to better meet the rapidly growing sales in AGV systems and its broadening AGV product range.

Egemin is going to build and test its automated guided vehicles in the new facility before delivering them to customers all over the world. AGVs, or automated guided vehicles, are unmanned vehicles used for transporting goods mainly in warehouses, distribution centers and production environments. The center will be equipped with special facilities including slopes, loading docks, warehouse racks, customer-specific loads and battery exchange stations to simulate the customer’s operational environment as good as possible. This should lead to shorter start-up and delivery times and improved quality and service levels for the customer. From now on, up to nine vehicles can be tested simultaneously in the new testing hall that covers an area of 2,200 m².

The new E’gv Factory has potential for even further growth and will be able to test around 200 E’gvs every year. The testing hall is located near the production hall where Egemin installs the cabling and switch boxes onto the chassis that have been delivered. Egemin has invested over 100,000 euros in the new center.



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About the Author

Josh Bond, Associate Editor
Josh Bond is an associate editor to Modern. Josh was formerly Modern’s lift truck columnist and contributing editor, has a degree in Journalism from Keene State College and has studied business management at Franklin Pierce. Contact Josh Bond

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