EPA may be going too far too fast?

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By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
June 13, 2010 - SCMR Editorial

Among those supply chain groups resisting the latest greenhouse gasses legislation is the The National Association of Manufacturers (NAM).

In a statement issued late last week, executive NAM’s vice president Jay Timmons told Senator Lisa Murkowski’s (R-Alaska) his organization was issuing a “resolution of disapproval” to prohibit the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from regulating greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act: “Manufacturers encourage Senators to vote in favor of the ‘resolution of disapproval’ and to stop the EPA from moving forward with its overreaching and economically destructive agenda,” he said.
Beginning in January 2011, the EPA plans to begin requiring certain manufacturers to obtain permits for their new facilities that exceed 75,000 tons of greenhouse gas emissions with other facilities of different sizes being phased in.

According to NAM, these costly new burdens create uncertainty, stifle job creation and harm manufacturers’ ability to compete in a global economy that does not have similar restrictions.

Furthermore, said NAM, the EPA’s new regulations not only expand the Agency’s power but come with no guidance from Congress.

“The Clean Air Act was never intended to control or regulate greenhouse gas emissions, and the EPA is ill-equipped to carry out this task,” said NAM spokesmen, noting that it will have dire consequences for distribution of U.S. goods.



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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Article Topics

Blogs · Green · EPA · All topics

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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