EU rightfully concerned about “flagging out” air cargo carriers

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
July 29, 2014 - LM Editorial

Flags of Convenience are a fact of life in the commercial maritime trade, but several European political action groups are worried that they will pose a threat to the Continent’s air cargo industry.

The Social Dialogue Committee for Civil Aviation is now demanding that the European Commission take “urgent measures” against the use of Flags of Convenience in aviation.

The Sectoral Social Dialogue Committees are the official EU representative forum for socio-economic interests.

The Sectoral Social Dialogue for Civil Aviation is the European Labor Management Body representing employers and employees. In the maritime sector, Flags of Convenience are used to secure access to weaker taxation and labor regulation, the Committee said. 

A joint declaration warned against the rise of Flags of Convenience in aviation, contending it would “lead European aviation to the fate of the decimated European maritime industry with almost no European crew left.”



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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Article Topics

Blogs · Air Cargo · Air Freight · Global Trade · All topics

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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