Finally coming into compliance with our NAFTA obligations

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By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
March 04, 2011 - SCMR Editorial

Following the announcement on Mexican trucking by President Obama and President Calderon, National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) Senior Vice President for Policy and Government Relations Aric Newhouse noted that his constituents are “pleased.”

He noted – quite correctly – that The United States is a global leader in ensuring enforcement of trade laws, and we need to lead by example.

Finally coming into compliance with our NAFTA obligations on Mexican trucks does just that. The NAM has led the effort in urging the Administration to reach an agreement to end these costly tariffs.

“Over the last two years, exports of U.S. manufactured goods to Mexico have been hit by retaliatory tariffs put in place because the United States refused to comply with legal commitments made as part of NAFTA,” Newhouse said. “As a result, American manufacturers have lost market share to other nations, and billions of dollars of U.S. exports to Mexico and tens of thousands of manufacturing jobs have been negatively impacted.”

NAM and other trade advocacy groups rightly note that the agreement brings the U.S. back into compliance with our commitments.

“We hope this dispute will be resolved and the tariffs lifted. We urge Congress to approve this agreement as quickly as possible to help manufacturers create new jobs and increase exports,” Newhouse said.

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About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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