Free foodservice guide outlines key data points for effective product recalls

The “Essential Information for an Effective and Efficient Product Recall” brochure from IFDA and IFMA outlines information to help distributors remove recalled product from the supply chain as soon as possible.
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By Lorie King Rogers, Associate Editor
January 07, 2011 - MMH Editorial

Food product recalls get a lot of attention.  That’s because food safety is a top priority for the entire foodservice supply chain, and the ability to execute recalls quickly is a critical element in a strong food safety program.  To support clear understanding of what information is needed for an efficient recall, the International Foodservice Distributors Association (IFDA) and the International Foodservice Manufacturers Association (IFMA) have released a new publication – “Essential Information for an Effective and Efficient Product Recall.”

Developed by a joint IFDA-IFMA food safety effort organized through the Supply Chain Optimization Resources and Execution (SCORE) initiative, the brochure details essential information that distributors need from manufacturers in order to remove recalled product from the supply chain as soon as possible.

Distributors are carrying thousands of SKUs in their warehouses and distribution centers, so they need to be adept at identifying recalled product as soon as possible, explains Jon Eisen, IFDA senior vice president of government relations.  Eisen told Modern that requirement was the impetus behind the development of this resource guide.

Recalls happen many times each year and they happen for many reasons, including a problem in the manufacturing process, labeling issues or contamination.  But regardless of the reason, distributors need to put their hands on the product quickly, says Eisen.  “The most critical element of understanding the scope of a recall is to have the proper information from the manufacturer, and that’s what we try to communicate in this literature.  We outline the key data elements needed to accomplish the recall effectively and efficiently and remove the product from the supply chain as soon as possible,” he says.

Both IFDA and IFMA are strongly committed to helping member companies ensure that their food safety programs are strong and effective.  The pamphlet will help provide the foodservice industry with a greater understanding of what is needed to allow companies to act quickly in order to remove product from the supply chain in the event of a recall.

This information has been provided to IFDA and IFMA members by mail with a recommendation that it be shared with quality assurance and other personnel involved in recall activity, as well as with supply chain partners. Click here to download “Essential Information for an Effective and Efficient Product Recall.”



About the Author

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Lorie King Rogers
Associate Editor

Lorie King Rogers, associate editor, joined Modern in 2009 after working as a freelance writer for the Casebook issue and show daily at tradeshows. A graduate of Emerson College, she has also worked as an editor on Stock Car Racing Magazine.


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