ILWU causes major labor disruptions at Port of LA/Long Beach

News of the impasse came from the negotiating teams representing employers at the ports of LA/Long Beach, who noted that unions had “refused to honor an area arbitrator’s order directing them to return to work.
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
November 28, 2012 - LM Editorial

The strike staged by International Longshore and Warehouse Union Local 63 Office Clerical Unit (“OCU”) against APM Terminals at the Port of Los Angeles escalated dramatically on Wednesday, and now the Port of Long Beach is in the thick of it, too.

The only terminal that has not been affected is TraPac,” said Port of Los Angeles spokesman, Phillip Sanfield.

Three of the six container terminals at the Port of Long Beach were not operating. These terminals were Long Beach Container Terminal at Pier F, International Transportation Service at Pier G and Total Terminals International at Pier T. The following terminals are operating; SSAT at Pier A, SSAT/Matson at Pier C and Pacific Container Terminal at Pier J. 

News of the impasse came from the negotiating teams representing employers at the ports of LA/Long Beach, who noted that unions had “refused to honor an area arbitrator’s order directing them to return to work.
Shippers were quick to react.

“A work stoppage at America’s two busiest ports just as the holiday shopping season begins is a recipe for disaster,” Sandy Kennedy , president of The Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA)  “If the strike isn’t resolved quickly, the effects on retailers, their customers and the economy will be enormous. We urge the parties to quickly resolve the dispute and get back to work in order to avoid the substantial economic damage a prolonged work stoppage would surely cause.”



About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Putting the renewed strength in the truckload market into a very positive perspective is a report issued by Avondale Partners analyst Donald Broughton, which was released yesterday. Entitled, “Q2’15 Trucking Capacity; Goldilocks Era Continues,” Broughton explained that in the second quarter only 70 truckload fleets failed, or exited the business. That number may seem high to some, but it is not, especially when you consider that the second quarter of 2014 saw more than five times as many truckload carriers, 375 to be exact, exit the business.

Global demand remains stable as packaging equipment providers of all sizes shift focus

Six straight days without a ship waiting for berth

Freight forwarders were relieved to learn yesterday that U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) would be delaying its Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) implementation.

The Institute for Supply Management’s (ISM) August edition of the Manufacturing Report on Business saw its PMI, the ISM’s index to measure growth, fall 1.6 percent to 51.1, following a 0.8 percent decline to 52.7 in July. Even with the relatively slow growth over the last two months, the PI has been at 50 or higher for 31 consecutive months.

Article Topics

News · Ocean Freight · Ports · Ocean Cargo · All topics

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA