It’s another (wild & wacky) Oracle Open World

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
September 20, 2010 - SCMR Editorial

While this week’s event is larger than ever, there’s a pronounced lean and green element to the supply chain management track worth noting.

More than 40,000 business professionals are turning out for Oracle Open World – a record number, according to spokesmen. But judging by the agenda logistics experts will be chiefly addressing sustainable shipping and sourcing.

Today, for example, Emerson Electric Corp. will give a presentation on “Lean Supply Chain Best Practices in Industrial Manufacturing.” At the same time, Oracle will be explaining how to leverage existing “solutions” in any given company’s lifecycle. In a session scheduled for this late this afternoon, analyst Beth Peterson of BPE Global will be telling shippers how to achieve a best practices model in a “Cross-border World.” Here, too, the objective is on leveraging global trade compliance while remaining socially responsible.

If you have not already noticed, the word “leverage” is dominating the conversation. And well it should. Fully 59 percent of the world’s developed nations are represented here, signaling a new demand for balance and shared vision.

And finally there’s the environmental impact to consider. Oracle spokesmen are quick to point out that this will be the most sustainable event in the company’s history. Most of the food sold and given away comes from local farms and growers, and waste generated by this huge crowd will not find its way into any landfills. That’s another significant logistical achievement, one might argue.

As to how much real transactional information is imparted, however, remains a valid question. Supply chain managers will be looking for more than happy talk when it comes to mapping out global strategies for 2011.



About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

In an effort to help buyers of freight transportation and logistics services to better understand the required best practices in order to be a shipper of choice for their carrier partners, non asset-based third-party logistics (3PL) services provider Transplace said this week it has rolled out a Preferred Shipper Checklist.

For a new facility in Chicago, DHL Global Forwarding converted to electric lift trucks. The result? Better uptime and a cleaner environment.

January carloads dropped 16.6 percent, or 192,747 annually, to 968,042, and intermodal volume was up 3.4 percent, or 34,523 units, annually at 1,039,621 containers and trailers.

While the PMA-ILWU dispute was settled last spring, a new port-related labor issue popped up on the East Coast last week, when a labor dispute on Friday, January 29 occurred when union members of the International Longshoremen Association (ILA), the largest union of maritime workers in North America, walked off the docks at the Port of New York and New Jersey, the largest East Coast port and second largest U.S. port.

“Sea Strangulation" explains how the United States has become vulnerable to Chinese maritime coercion and details a challenge from China that the U.S. is ill-prepared to meet.

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.