Kenco certified by WBENC, becomes largest woman-owned logistics company

Certification included an in-depth review of the business as well as a site inspection.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
November 28, 2012 - MMH Editorial

Kenco Group, a leading provider of distribution, transportation and supply chain intelligence solutions, is pleased to announce that it has received national certification as a Women’s Business Enterprise by the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC).

Read Modern’s System Report on Kenco.


WBENC’s national standard of certification is a rigorous process that has included an in-depth review of the business as well as a site inspection. The certification process is designed to confirm that the business is at least 51% owned, operated and controlled by a woman or women.

Kenco became a woman-owned business when controlling interest in the company was acquired by chairwoman and CEO Jane Kennedy Greene in 2011. She provides strategic direction to the organization and leads the Kenco Board of Directors. “I am delighted that Kenco has been certified as a woman-owned business enterprise,” says Greene, who purchased controlling interest in Kenco from her father, Jim Kennedy, Jr. “This allows us to better serve our clients by helping them meet their supplier diversity initiatives.”

“Kenco has been a true partner to Cummins for over 16 years,” says Gordon Fykes, Director, Diversity Procurement at Cummins Inc. “This certification supports Cummins in achieving our supplier diversity goals and exemplifies how Kenco continues to find new ways to drive uncommon value for our company.”

By including women-owned businesses among their vendors, corporations and government agencies demonstrate their commitment to fostering diversity and the continued development of their supplier/vendor diversity programs.



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Article Topics

News · 3PL · Logistics · Kenco · All topics

About the Author

Josh Bond, Associate Editor
Josh Bond is an associate editor to Modern. Josh was formerly Modern’s lift truck columnist and contributing editor, has a degree in Journalism from Keene State College and has studied business management at Franklin Pierce. Contact Josh Bond

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