Maersk Back in the Black

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
August 20, 2013 - SCMR Editorial

A.P. Moller-Maersk upped its 2013 profit forecast late last week, mainly due to the performance of its ocean cargo division, citing lower fuel costs and effective cost cutting measures. 



Maersk Line, which controls 15 percent of the world’s container shipping capacity, made a second-quarter net profit of $439 million, compared with $227 million year over year, and significantly exceeding an average analyst forecast of $99 million. 


“We deliver a good operational result for the quarter thanks to improved performance in most of our businesses. Maersk Line has made strong and consistent progress and is now an industry leader in terms of profitability,” says Group CEO Nils S. Andersen.
“APM Terminals continues to deliver good results, and Maersk Drilling had its best quarter ever based on strong operational performance.

“Oil production was relatively low, but it has bottomed out now and will return to growth in the second half of the year.

“On Group level, we seek to further advance performance and growth by establishing a fifth core business unit with a target of $0.5 billion by 2016.”



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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Article Topics

News · Global · Supply Chain · Management · All topics

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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