Materials handling: Meller receives Reed-Apple Award at MHIA meetings

Becomes 19th recipient in the past 30 years
By Bob Trebilcock, Executive Editor
October 05, 2010 - MMH Editorial

Palm Springs, Calif.: Dr. Russell D. Meller received the MHEFI Reed-Apple Award on Tuesday at the Material Handling Industry of America (MHIA) fall meetings.

Established to memorialize material handling education pioneers Dr. Jim Apple, Sr., of Georgia Tech and Dr. Rudy Reed of Purdue, the Reed-Apple Award recognizes outstanding individuals for their contributions, dedication and service to the material handling logistics field and for the support of the Material Handling Education Foundation (MHEFI).

Meller, who is the Hefley Professor of Logistics & Entrepreneurship in the University of Arkansas’ Department of Industrial Engineering and the director of the NSF-sponsored Center or Engineering, Logistics & Distribution, is only the 19th recipient of the award over the past 30 years.

“In the 18 years since he received his PhD from the University of Michigan, Russ Meller has distinguished himself as an educator, counselor, writer with an unmatched number of publications, patent holder, consultant and innovator,” said John Hill, the MHIA governor who presented the award. “We look forward to your continuing contribution and guidance for many years to come.”



About the Author

Bob Trebilcock
Executive Editor

Bob Trebilcock, executive editor, has covered materials handling, technology and supply chain topics for Modern Materials Handling since 1984. More recently, Trebilcock became editorial director of Supply Chain Management Review. A graduate of Bowling Green State University, Trebilcock lives in Keene, NH. He can be reached at 603-357-0484.


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About the Author

Bob Trebilcock, editorial director, has covered materials handling, technology, logistics and supply chain topics for nearly 30 years. In addition to Supply Chain Management Review, he is also Executive Editor of Modern Materials Handling. A graduate of Bowling Green State University, Trebilcock lives in Keene, NH. He can be reached at 603-357-0484 or email [email protected].

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