Merger of LA/LB Ports Proposed

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
April 17, 2014 - SCMR Editorial

In a move that is already stirring controversy, The L.A. 2020 Commission, has suggested that The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach merge cargo operations.

The Commission, comprising prominent business, labor and civic leaders, maintains that market share will be threatened if this move is not made soon.

“That drop in market share alone is the size of the fifth-biggest port in the country, Seattle-Tacoma, which accounts for more than 60,000 jobs and has in excess of $100 million in revenue,” the commission said. “We should fight to bring those jobs and tax revenues back to Los Angeles.”

In the last 10 years, the ports’ combined market share fell more than 5 percentage points, the report adds.

Outgoing Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster and Doug Drummond, president of the Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners have publicly stated that “this is a bad idea.”

Meanwhile, both ports are still searching for executive directors.



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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Article Topics

News · Ocean Cargo · Trade · Seaports · All topics

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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