Motion Control Association surpasses the 100 company membership mark

MCA was founded in late 2006 with only a handful of members. Membership increased 40% in 2013 alone.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
January 02, 2014 - MMH Editorial

The Motion Control Association (MCA), the global trade group representing the motion control industry, announced that it has reached a milestone of surpassing 100 member companies.

This reflects a strong momentum of recent growth for the association that was founded in late 2006 with just a handful of leading motion control industry suppliers. Members now include manufacturers of motion control components and systems, distributors, system integrators, consulting firms, and research groups directly involved with mechanical and electronic (mechatronics) motion control all around the world.

According to MCA, this new foundation of member companies will enable them to round out the services they currently provide to the industry and add more to the offering as well. “One of our most sought after member benefits is our quarterly market statistics reports, which all members receive. As we increase our membership and participation in this trusted data collection program, the statistics reports get better and the analysis can be detailed in new and useful ways,” explained Dana Whalls, MCA’s vice president. “We’ll continue building on our successful webinar series, bringing useful education right to people’s desktops and we plan to increase our educational outreach by developing a training and certification program on basic motion control technologies. We’ll also invest in our industry portal website (www.motioncontrolonline.org) which provides great articles, news, company profiles and products. We’ll enhance the site with more video and social media elements and useful member tools within the site.”

MCA is governed by a Board of Directors made up of key industry professionals. John Hegel, CEO of American Control Electronics is the current Chairman of the Board and has been active in the membership building efforts of MCA. “In 2013 alone we’ve had a 40% increase in our membership and we see that as the tipping point for continued rapid growth of the association,” said John Hegel. The popular members-only MCA Business Conference, which is held in January each year, continues to drive membership increases. “Most associations offer annual meetings featuring high-quality speakers, and MCA does as well. The MCA difference is two-fold; first, most of our attendees are owners, presidents or vice-presidents of their organizations. They are the key decision makers from our member companies, the folks that make things happen and are often hard to find at other events. And second, we co-locate with our two sister associations, the Robotic Industries Association (RIA) and AIA – the global trade group for vision and imaging. Attendees are able to network and do business with the leaders in robotics and vision, two industries that drive many technological advances. Our members find this a highly tangible benefit and just one of many solid reasons to join MCA. The upcoming conference already has 400 pre-registered attendees and that number will grow,” explained Mr. Hegel.

MCA, along with the entire A3 group, produce the bi-annual trade show called Automate. This broad automation technologies show will next be held March 23-26, 2015 at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois. The growth in MCA is reflected in the exhibitor base for the 2015 show, with motion control technology companies already exceeding the exhibit space from 2013 and the show is still a year and a half away.



Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

The index ISM uses to measure non-manufacturing growth—known as the NMI—was 56.0 in June, which edged out May by 0.3 percent.

Regardless of the date or year, one thing is beyond consistent when it comes to key themes in freight transportation logistics: the state of United States highways and related transportation infrastructure is in an eternal state of chaos and disrepair.

The high-volume warehouse or distribution center that supports B2B, Omni-channel activities, direct-to-consumer shipments, and the Internet of Things all require a flexible and scalable supply chain in order to function at optimal capacity. The problem is that most of today's supply chains are made up of fragmented silos of information that compromise their ability to compete, be responsive to customer demands or seize new business opportunities.

As customers' demands constantly evolve, transportation and logistics (T&L) operations are being put under growing pressure to offer more efficient delivery services, while not compromising on customer service. Using findings from a research survey conducted among transport and logistics managers around the world, this report explores how a combination of mobile technology implementations for mobile workers, and process re-engineering efforts can elevate operations to the next level.

It's a fact - most best-of-breed WMS providers force you to pay every time you require a system change. Uncover five more dirty secrets many warehouse management systems providers don't want you to know. Download the white paper 5 Dirty Secrets of Warehouse Management Systems to discover these hidden truths and gain valuable information on considerations for evaluating WMS vendors.

About the Author

Josh Bond, Associate Editor
Josh Bond is an associate editor to Modern. Josh was formerly Modern’s lift truck columnist and contributing editor, has a degree in Journalism from Keene State College and has studied business management at Franklin Pierce. Contact Josh Bond

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.