New CIT Group Study Signals Confidence in Mid-Market Supply Chains

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
October 11, 2013 - SCMR Editorial

Middle market executives, whose companies take in more than $6 trillion in revenues and employ more than 30 million people annually, are expressing renewed optimism in their business prospects compared to a year ago.

However, despite this positive outlook they are concerned about potential tax increases, government regulations, compliance with the Affordable Care Act and the current strength of the U.S. and global economies.

These are just a few of the findings contained in a new study, CIT: Voice of the Middle Market – Perspectives from the Heart of the U.S. Economy, by CIT Group, Inc.

“Our study shows that middle market executives are optimistic about their future, but temper this optimism over concerns related to taxes, government regulations and compliance with the Affordable Care Act,” said John Thain, Chairman and CEO of CIT. “As one of the leading job creators in the United States and the economic backbone of America, middle market companies are looking to grow their businesses but feel greater attention needs to be paid to the policies that directly affect their companies and their concerns on Capitol Hill.”

These findings mirror those given recently by U.S. financial officers who were significantly more confident about economic growth in 2013 in the latest Bank of America Merrill Lynch CFO Outlook survey.



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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