New Supply Chain Talent Academic Initiative gets underway

The Supply Chain Talent Academic Initiative (SCTAI) leverages experience and leadership from all sectors of industry and academia to enrich the supply chain talent pool.
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
July 28, 2010 - SCMR Editorial

A critical need for skills-savvy supply chain professionals is fueling a coordinated effort to increase the depth of talent and promote an abundance of career paths.

The Supply Chain Talent Academic Initiative (SCTAI) leverages experience and leadership from all sectors of industry and academia to enrich the supply chain talent pool. SCTAI is a global partnership that began as a call to action at the Supply Chain Council World Conference two years ago.

“Companies that provide direct financial support will have direct input into the initiative’s priorities, and will also have access to a supply chain management grant-making simulation that is under development,” said spokesmen.

SCTAI members include individuals from major universities and corporations, as well as leading supply management and operations management associations, including Institute for Supply Management; APICS The Association for Operations Management and Supply Chain Council.

Participating consultancies and academic institutions include Gartner; Michigan State University; The Pennsylvania State University and University of Texas – Austin.

The initiative is designed to benefit the profession as a whole. Participants have embarked on research, workshops and cross-industry projects that support several goals:

1) Identify industry competency requirements for supply chain talent, and provide forecasts of those requirements for university program planning
2) Assist universities and other educational institutions in building programs to meet those competency requirements
3) Market the supply chain profession as a career of choice

Founding member Jake Barr said in a statement that the group seeks additional participants, as well as industry funding:

“We welcome fresh perspectives and ideas,” says Barr, a director of manufacturing, planning and logistics for Procter & Gamble (P&G). “Companies that provide direct financial support will have direct input into the initiative’s priorities, and will also have access to a supply chain management grant-making simulation that is under development.”

Companies that have provided financial support to date include: The Boeing Company, IBM, Intel Corporation, Royal Philips Electronics, Procter & Gamble (P&G) and Whirlpool Corporation.



About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Total POLB volumes dropped 9.1 percent in August at 573,083 TEU, and POLA volumes in August were up 6.7 percent compared to August 2013 at 757,702 TEU.

Following a week in which the average price per gallon was flat, diesel prices resumed their decline, falling 1.3 cents to $3.801 per gallon, according to the Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration.

Read how others are using Business Process Modeling to implement Microsoft Dynamics AX with reduced risk.

While diesel prices have largely been out of the spotlight in 2014, freight transportation and logistics stakeholders always need to keep a close eye on what prices are doing, as it has a significant impact on transportation budgets and forecasting.

Railroad service issues and rates, which many rail shippers deem as unreasonable, are front and center in a piece of legislation to be introduced soon by Senators Jay Rockefeller (D-WV) and John Thune (R-SD), chairman and ranking member of the Senate Committee on Commerce Science and Transportation.

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.