NMHG adds two executives to leadership team

Ne VP of warehouse solutions and director of leasing have more than 40 years of combined industry experience.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
July 14, 2014 - MMH Editorial

NACCO Materials Handling Group (NMHG), the parent company of Hyster Company and Yale Materials Handling Corporation, has announced the addition of Mike McCormick as vice president of warehouse solutions and Bill Buckhout as director of leasing and remarketing.

McCormick and Buckhout have more than 40 years of combined industry experience.

“We continue to seek talented individuals who will contribute to the strategic leadership and global support behind Hyster and Yale lift trucks,” said Chuck Pascarelli, president of sales and marketing for NMHG. “Mike and Bill’s extensive knowledge of our industry and significant experience in previous roles are of immense value to NMHG. As the warehouse market segment continues to grow, Mike’s leadership enables us to focus on meeting the materials handling needs and challenges specific to end-users in this market. Similarly, Bill will emphasize customer-centric service for our leasing and remarketing division.”

McCormick has an extensive background in sales and product marketing and has held roles of progressive responsibility throughout his career in companies such as Caterpillar, FMC, Daewoo Heavy Industries, Elwell Parker, and BT Prime-Mover, in addition to most recently serving as director of product management for a materials handling company.

Buckhout most recently served as a leasing operations and marketing manager and has held a number of roles in sales, equipment leasing/rental management, marketing and financial services in companies including Rapidparts, Inc., and other materials handling companies.



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About the Author

Josh Bond, Associate Editor
Josh Bond is an associate editor to Modern. Josh was formerly Modern’s lift truck columnist and contributing editor, has a degree in Journalism from Keene State College and has studied business management at Franklin Pierce. Contact Josh Bond

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