“Occupy” Movement update

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
December 12, 2011 - LM Editorial

Here’s the latest news on the “Occupy” movement’s plan to blockade West Coast ports today:

*The Occupy movement has expanded its call for a port shutdown to virtually all major ports on the West Coast. It is targeting ports of all sizes, and the current named list includes: San Diego, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Hueneme, Oakland, Portland, Longview, Tacoma, and Seattle.

*In addition, it has called for sympathy blockades at the Port of Houston and at inland locations such as Denver.

The Port of Oakland – which may be the epicenter for the Occupy movement, is telling shippers the following:

*Blockade organizers plan to assemble protesters early in the morning at 5:30 a.m. at West Oakland BART station, presumably to disrupt morning labor shifts. It also plans a march from downtown Oakland to the Port at 5 pm.

*As of late last week, all seven marine terminals plan to be open. However, they may not hire a full complement of labor and thus may operate at reduced capacity. Also, some service providers, such as trucking companies, have decided not to service the port on Monday to avoid potential delays. They are advising shippers to check with ocean carriers and transportation service providers for their operational status today.

The Port of Oakland is also telling shippers “What We Don’t Know.” This includes:
*An estimate of the size of the planned protest, how long protesters will march, and if they will attempt to disrupt port operations with street blockades, picket lines, etc.

*The response of ILWU members and other organized labor to any picket line or restriction to terminal access.

* How long any protest march will last, or if it will spill over to Tuesday.

Meanwhile, Oakland and all the other ports are engaged in outreach to business and community groups, conducting interviews with local and national media, and asking partners to express their support.



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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