P3 Network Collapses: Some Conjecture

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
June 18, 2014 - SCMR Editorial

News that China’s Ministry of Commerce has withheld its approval of the P3 Network – comprising the world’s three largest ocean cargo carriers – may give shippers a reason to consider the viability of such an arrangement to begin with. Can the Chinese be right about fearing a rate-fixing monopoly?

Denmark’s AP Møller-Maersk, France’s CMA CGM SA and Switzerland-based Mediterranean Shipping Co. had good reason to believe that the alliance was a “done deal” as recently as last week. With the United States Federal Maritime Commission signing off on P3 to become effective in the U.S., and the subsequent European Commission blessings, the only remaining obstacle was China.

And as our News Editor, Jeff Berman, recently reported, the carriers were confident that approval was only a formality.

But China’s Ministry of Commerce – citing anti-trust concerns – noted that P3 would control 47% of the Asia-to-Europe container shipping market, and failed to demonstrate that it would bring more benefit than harm to shippers’ interest.

Meanwhile, the G6 collaboration may soon be rethinking their plans for the future. American President Lines, Hapag Lloyd, Hyundai Merchant Marine, Mitsui, Nippon, and OOCL had only agreed to join forces as a competitive alternative to P3.

With that deal quashed, mightn’t we expect more disruption in containerized shipping? In any case, the irony is that a command economy like China can reshape free market forces by creating disincentives for potential corporate collusion.

Related: China Torpedoes P3 Alliance Plans



About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Both the mega-port of Los Angeles, and the Port of Oakland (California's third largest ocean cargo gateway, issued positive reports this month.

The American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA) applauded introduction of The Bipartisan Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability Act of 2015 (TPA-2015), which is bipartisan legislation to modernize and renew U.S. Trade Promotion Authority (TPA).

Container lines must accelerate their internal-transformation efforts and extract more value from their alliances in order to restore profitability, according to a new report by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG).

A.T. Kearney released the 2015 Global Retail E-Commerce Index, a study designed to help retailers devise successful global online retail strategies and identify market investment opportunities while understanding the tradeoffs and barriers to success.

The MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics (CTL) invites readers to participate in a short survey regarding Supply Chain Visibility in their organizations.

Article Topics

News · Ocean Cargo · Shipping · China · All topics

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.