Global Logistics: Panjiva data points to seasonal growth pattern in global trade

By Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
May 18, 2011 - LM Editorial

A seasonal economic growth pattern appears to be shaping up based on the most recent set of data from Panjiva, an online search engine with detailed information on global suppliers and manufacturers.

Coming off of a 4 percent gain in United States-bound waterborne shipments from January to February, shipments from March to April saw a 7 percent bump with 959,364 shipments, said Panjiva. And the number of global manufacturers shipping to the U.S.—at 139,337 was up 6 percent.

Even though the last two months of shipment data have been on the right track, prior months have shown an uneven ride, with a 17 percent increase from December to January and down 14 percent from November to December. Waterborne shipments have been down sequentially in six of the last eight months.

“This data is pretty solid,” Panjiva CEO Josh Green told LM. “Certainly, I would expect to see a seasonal increase, but the increase from March to April this year was healthier than last year’s March to April increase. We were essentially running around 2010 levels of activity, but with the bump April 2011 shipments came in ahead of April 2010 by about 2 percent.”

Green explained that the hope with these numbers is that global trade is picking up steam. But he cautioned that a few more months of positive data is needed, as there are still clouds on the horizon in the form of a declining Euro, the U.S. recently announcing it has reached its debt ceiling, and consumer spending patterns, which if negative, will have a negative impact on global trade.

With manufacturing data being strong for more than a year, that has benefitted global shipment numbers. And some experts maintain that any type of economic recovery occurring is a manufacturing-led one. Green’s take on that assessment was mixed.

“The manufacturing sector is stronger than it has been in some time, but I am not a believer in the manufacturing-led economy, as strength in manufacturing is a bet that consumer confidence will grow,” said Green. “If that does not materialize, a manufacturing-led economy will disappear quite quickly—and any gains in the manufacturing sector will end up being temporary. There won’t be the demand to justify the supply.”

Looking ahead, Green said continued growth is expected through August, which will serve as the high point for the year, adding that April to May is typically a big bounce, with a 5-to-10 percent sequential increase in shipments possible based on seasonal trends. Anything less than 5 percent will be disappointing, he said, and anything higher than 10 percent will be a definitive indication that the recovery is gaining steam.

Click here for more articles about Panjiva.



About the Author

Jeff Berman headshot
Jeff Berman
Group News Editor

Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Following a week in which the average price per gallon was flat, diesel prices resumed their decline, falling 1.3 cents to $3.801 per gallon, according to the Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration.

Read how others are using Business Process Modeling to implement Microsoft Dynamics AX with reduced risk.

While diesel prices have largely been out of the spotlight in 2014, freight transportation and logistics stakeholders always need to keep a close eye on what prices are doing, as it has a significant impact on transportation budgets and forecasting.

Railroad service issues and rates, which many rail shippers deem as unreasonable, are front and center in a piece of legislation to be introduced soon by Senators Jay Rockefeller (D-WV) and John Thune (R-SD), chairman and ranking member of the Senate Committee on Commerce Science and Transportation.

The Nicaragua Canal will be three times the length of the Panama Canal, crossing the major Lago de Nicaragua, one of the largest freshwater reservoirs in the region.

About the Author

Jeff Berman, News Editor
Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. Contact Jeff Berman.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA