Port of LA/Long Beach strike update: Shippers demand executive action

In Los Angeles, operations at 10 of the 14 terminals have stopped. In Long Beach, three of six terminals are closed.
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
November 30, 2012 - LM Editorial

While negotiating teams representing employers at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach meet with the International Longshore and Warehouse Union Local 63 Office Clerical Unit (“OCU”) today, several key terminals at both ocean cargo gateways are shut down.

In Los Angeles, operations at 10 of the 14 terminals have stopped. In Long Beach, three of six terminals are closed.

The strike has already had a severe impact on the flow of cargo and on jobs in the harbor community, with multiple ships sitting idle at berth or at anchor in the harbor and hundreds of workers in the ports out of work, report port authorities.

Industry analysts note that there is a significant amount of freight on the water now, so retailers will have to assess over the next week or so whether to ship to alternative ports for current/future Asia departures and whether the goods that are already on the water will make it in time to market (or if extra needs to be shipped airfreight).

Meanwhile, with cargo destined for retail shelves stranded in the San Pedro harbor, the Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) is demanding that the Obama Administration step in:

“Given the enormous risk posed by a prolonged shutdown of the nation’s busiest ports, we urge you to consider all options, including invoking the Taft-Hartley Act, in order to restore the critical flow of commerce,” said RILA president, Sandra L. Kennedy

“We respectfully ask that you put the weight of the White House behind resolving this dispute.”



About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

A couple of years ago, the rush to alternatively fueled vehicles was on. Diesel prices had surged past $4, the American Trucking Associations hosted an overflow crowd at its alternative fuels “summit” for trucking executives and energy tycoon T. Boone Pickens offered what might have been the ultimate assessment of where fuel prices were headed.

As a sector with myriad moving parts, coupled with obstacles like increased risks, cost pressures, among others, the healthcare supply chain is replete with uncertainties. But there are ways for the sector to counter these challenges, too, according to the seventh annual UPS “Pain in the (Supply) Chain healthcare surve

The study examines the trajectory of offshoring cost arbitrage to low-cost developing countries, the rise of new locations, and the fact that there’s ample room for growth.

In a rare show of solidarity, various trucking interests are asking the Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration to remove online safety ratings of individual motor carriers until flaws in the CSA methodology are fixed.

While it feels somewhat hard to fathom, the stage is set for the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) Annual Conference in San Antonio, Texas.

Article Topics

News · Ocean Freight · Ports · Ocean Cargo · All topics

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA