Port of Rotterdam Overwhelmed

Serious operational problems and delays at the Euromax, ECT Home and ECT Delta terminals in Rotterdam these past three weeks have caused both delays and short-shipments of cargo to and from the Baltic and Scandinavian countries.
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The Port of Rotterdam is the largest port in Europe, located in the city of Rotterdam, South Holland, the Netherlands. From 1962 until 1986 it was the world’s busiest port, now overtaken by Asian ports like Singapore and Shanghai.

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
July 22, 2010 - LM Editorial

Shippers using the EU’s biggest seaport may be hit with new surcharges next month.

Serious operational problems and delays at the Euromax, ECT Home and ECT Delta terminals in Rotterdam these past three weeks have caused both delays and short-shipments of cargo to and from the Baltic and Scandinavian countries.

According to ?Unifeeder, a leading container feeder carrier, the situation is caused by a lack of manpower and increased volumes, combined with delayed ocean liners causing peaks at terminals exceeding their capacity.

“Consequently,” said spokesmen, “we are experiencing delays beyond 36 hours as well as short-shipments on our Scandinavian and Baltic services, and the performance of the terminals has prevented us from maintaining our planned schedule.”

This added spokesmen, was in spite of a concerted effort to maintain quality operations.

“Accordingly, we have experienced a loss of revenue and we have been facing additional operational costs as a result of our vessels laying idle in Rotterdam for a longer period of time, extra fuel consumption and overtime costs in the wayports.,” spokesmen said.

This report was corroborated by Maersk Line, which issued a release stating that there has been “unprecedented” traffic increase in EU-Asia trade lanes.

“As these challenges are caused by external factors of which Unifeeder has no control, we cannot absorb the extra costs for feeder vessels arising from this unfortunate situation,” said spokesmen.

“If this situation continues during the next weeks we will implement a congestion surcharge as from 1 August.”



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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