Portable voice from Voxware

Voxware (Booth 3672) is promoting portability for voice recognition solutions.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
March 23, 2011 - MMH Editorial

If you use Microsoft Office on a Dell laptop, the same software will work on a Windows machine from HP, Acer or Sony without rewriting a line of code. In other words, the software is portable from one device to another.

Voxware (Booth 3672) is promoting portability for voice recognition solutions as well. “We believe there is a difference between supporting various device platforms from hardware vendors like LXE and Motorola and a truly portable platform,” said Stephen Gerrard, VP of marketing and strategic planning at a booth visit on Wednesday. “With a truly portable voice solution, you can work on a Motorola device today and switch to a new device from LXE tomorrow, all without rewriting a line of code.”

Gerrard adds that a current customer put Voxware’s solution to the test by loading it onto devices from three manufacturers before choosing a hardware vendor. “They wanted to be certain they could move the solution if their needs change in the future,” Gerrard told Modern.

Developments like portability of software represent a maturing voice recognition industry. “In the past, it was OK to implement a proprietary voice system because there weren’t the options that there are today in the market,” Gerrard said. “Today, IT managers want to be able to run the solution on whatever hardware the want to run it on. Portability makes that possible.”

ProMat 2011 will be held March 21 - 24, 2011 at McCormick Place South in Chicago. The tradeshow will showcase the latest manufacturing, distribution and supply chain solutions in the material handling and logistics industry.

Read all of Modern’s ProMat 2011 coverage

 



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