Conveyor Product: High-capacity spiral conveyors

Continuously conveying full and empty bottles, cans, jars and similar containers up or down are mass flow spiral conveyors.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
October 22, 2010 - MMH Editorial

Continuously conveying full and empty bottles, cans, jars and similar containers up or down are mass flow spiral conveyors. The conveyor’s small footprint yields space savings. Equipped with extended in- and out-feed tangents to facilitate smooth side transfer to and from external conveyors, the spirals come with 12-, 16- or 20-inch wide slats. Capacities reach 2,000 bottles or cans per minute. Powdered coated carbon steel, stainless steel and washdown finishes may be specified. Ryson, 757-898-1530, www.ryson.com



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Article Topics

· Materials Handling · Conveyors · Packaging · Ryson · All topics

About the Author

Bob Heaney is a seasoned professional with over 25 years of distinguished leadership experience in research, analysis, and advisory roles in Supply Chain Engineering. Heaney’s coverage area within Aberdeen includes various elements of Supply Chain Execution (Transportation Management, Warehouse Management, Distributed Order Management and Supply Chain Visibility). Contact Bob Heaney

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