Packaging Product: Inflatable truck dunnage bags secure loads in transit

For bracing trailer loads to avoid damage from shifting, Air-Lock truck dunnage bags offer a sustainable, security-sensitive solution.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
October 19, 2010 - MMH Editorial

For bracing trailer loads to avoid damage from shifting, Air-Lock truck dunnage bags offer a sustainable, security-sensitive solution. Constructed of a see-through material for enhanced visibility, the dunnage provides a low cost alternative to kraft paper or vinyl (PVC) bags. Features include a highly conforming structure and cling effect when used with stretch films to reduce product migration. They inflate with a valve and seal closed quickly. Inflatable Packaging, 203-426-2900, www.airpackaging.com.



Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

The ongoing financial travails of the Highway Trust Fund was made clear in a position paper recently issued by Jeff Davis, senior fellow at the Eno Center for Transportation. In the paper–entitled “Why Not A Ten-Year Surface Transportation Bill?”-Davis points to past federal transportation bills, as well as the White House’s GROW AMERICA proposal as having one fatal flaw in common: they each leave the HTF on worst financial shape after the bill expires than it was prior to the bill being enacted.

Working with research partner, The Economist Intelligence Unit, the IBM Institute for Business Value surveyed 1,023 global procurement executives from 41 countries in North America, Europe and Asia.

U.S. Carloads were down 7.8 percent annually at 259,544, and intermodal volume was off 15.7 percent for the week ending February 21 at 213,617 containers and trailers.

The Department of Transportation’s Bureau of Transportation Logistics (BTS) reported this week that U.S. trade with its North America Free Trade Agreement partners Canada and Mexico in December 2014 was up 5.4 percent annually at $95.8 billion. This marks the 11th straight month of annual increases, according to BTS officials.

While the volume decline was steep, there was numerous reasons behind it, including terminal congestion, protracted contract negotiations between the Pacific Maritime Association and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, and other supply chain-related issues, according to POLA officials.

About the Author

Bob Heaney is a seasoned professional with over 25 years of distinguished leadership experience in research, analysis, and advisory roles in Supply Chain Engineering. Heaney’s coverage area within Aberdeen includes various elements of Supply Chain Execution (Transportation Management, Warehouse Management, Distributed Order Management and Supply Chain Visibility). Contact Bob Heaney

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.