Packaging Product: Multipacker reduces packaging waste

The continuous motion Tritium multipacker includes the RoboWand programmable path wrapping section for enhanced versatility, ease of changeover, and finished product quality.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
October 25, 2010 - MMH Editorial

The continuous motion Tritium multipacker includes the RoboWand programmable path wrapping section for enhanced versatility, ease of changeover, and finished product quality. The system uses single, double and triple lane configurations to arrange products in compact patterns for wrapping in film. With an infinite number of paths, the RoboWand can be programmed to handle packages of any size for shorter changeover times and no changeover of parts. It works at varying speeds and provides precise, tight wrapping without trays and pads, cutting packaging material consumption. Standard-Knapp, 860-342-1100, www.standard-knapp.com.



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About the Author

Bob Heaney is a seasoned professional with over 25 years of distinguished leadership experience in research, analysis, and advisory roles in Supply Chain Engineering. Heaney’s coverage area within Aberdeen includes various elements of Supply Chain Execution (Transportation Management, Warehouse Management, Distributed Order Management and Supply Chain Visibility). Contact Bob Heaney

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