Automation product: Printer-applicator prints, encodes and applies RFID labels

The model 5300rfid label printer-applicator prints, encodes, verifies and applies pressure-sensitive RFID smart labels to cartons and pallet loads in one automatic operation.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
October 26, 2010 - MMH Editorial

The model 5300rfid label printer-applicator prints, encodes, verifies and applies pressure-sensitive RFID smart labels to cartons and pallet loads in one automatic operation. As the label is printed, the integrated encoder simultaneously transfers digital information to the ultra-high frequency (UHF) transponder embedded in the pressure-sensitive label material. If the system determines that a tag is unverifiable, it rejects the label prior to application. The printer includes thermal/thermal-transfer print-encode engines to produce imprints with text, bar codes and graphics at 203 or 300 dpi. Depending upon the print engine, labels can measure up to 5 x 6 inches and output at speeds up to 12 inches per second. Weber Marking Systems, 847-364-8500, www.webermarking.com.



Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

With no fuel tax increase likely ahead of this year’s mid-term elections, trucking interests in Washington are moving to Plan B in their attempt to shore up funding for badly needed infrastructure improvements.

Crowley Maritime Corporation has acquired majority ownership of Accord Ship Management (HK) Limited and Accord Marine Management Pvt. Ltd.

To catch a rising economic tide this year, the Port of Long Beach will need to modernize and find new efficiencies to move increasing amounts of cargo at a faster pace, said experts gathered earlier this month for the Port’s 10th annual “Peak Season Forecast” at the Long Beach Convention Center.

They are an annual rite of passage, general rate increases (GRIs) in the less-than-truckload (LTL) sector of the trucking industry. But is anyone paying attention? And more importantly, is anyone actually paying these announced GRIs, this year in the 3.9 to 5.4 percent range?

About the Author

Bob Heaney is a seasoned professional with over 25 years of distinguished leadership experience in research, analysis, and advisory roles in Supply Chain Engineering. Heaney’s coverage area within Aberdeen includes various elements of Supply Chain Execution (Transportation Management, Warehouse Management, Distributed Order Management and Supply Chain Visibility). Contact Bob Heaney

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.