Packaging Product: Stretch wrapper system uses less

No film break (NFB) stretch wrapping machines use a film delivery system that seamlessly and consistently wraps loads without breakage.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
October 20, 2010 - MMH Editorial

No film break (NFB) stretch wrapping machines use a film delivery system that seamlessly and consistently wraps loads without breakage. Offered on two models—the RS-6000 and NFB S-automatic—the technology secures loads with twice the containment force as conventional wrappers. The system lowers film costs by requiring fewer revolutions to stabilize loads, translating into a reduction of 30% less film used. By requiring fewer equipment adjustments, the unit also provides more uptime. Lantech, 800-866-0322, www.lantech.com.



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About the Author

Bob Heaney is a seasoned professional with over 25 years of distinguished leadership experience in research, analysis, and advisory roles in Supply Chain Engineering. Heaney’s coverage area within Aberdeen includes various elements of Supply Chain Execution (Transportation Management, Warehouse Management, Distributed Order Management and Supply Chain Visibility). Contact Bob Heaney

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